Search billions of records on Ancestry.com

Mine buggy - Virtual Museum of Coal Mining in Western Pennsylvania
Virtual Museum of Coal Mining in Western Pennsylvania

Digital Coal Research Library
The 20th Century Society of Western Pennsylvania
Links to:
Coal Miners Memorial, Magee Mine, Yukon, Sewickley Twp., Westmoreland Co., PA

Coal Company Patch Town, Yukon, Sewickley Twp., Westmoreland Co., PA


Coal Mines of Westmoreland Co., PA INDEX
Township Map of Westmoreland Co., Pennsylvania
Map of R.R. Transportation System Westmoreland Co.
In Association with Amazon.com
Magee Mine
(Maggie Mine)

Sewickley Township,
& Yukon (The Town),
South Huntingdon Twp.
Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania

A Tribute to the Coal Miners that mined the Bituminous Coal seams of the Magee Mine, Sewickley Township & Yukon, South Huntingdon Township, Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania

Compiled & Edited by
Raymond A. Washlaski

Raymond A. Washlaski, Historian, Editor,
Ryan P. Washlaski, Technical Editor,

Updated Oct. 31, 2008

(This Site still Underconstruction)

Magee Mine (Maggie Mine) (ca.1908-1954),
Located near PA SR 3012, on the Yukon Branch of the Pennsylvania Railroad, the mine was on the east bank of Sewickley Creek, in Sewickley Township, Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania, north-west of the town of Yukon, Sewickley Township, Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania. Yukon, Pennsylvania, is the coal company patch town associated with the Magee Mine, and is located in South Huntingdon Township, Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania.
[Magee Mine is listed as active on the ca.1954 USGS Smithton PA 15 min. Quad. topo map.]
Owners: (ca.1908-1945), Westmoreland Coal Company, Irwin, PA
              (ca.1945-1954), Pittsburgh Consolidation Coal Company, Pittsburgh, PA

Opening the Magee Mine
Mule teams and back breaking hand labor was used by the workmen in opening the double-portal slope-entry for the Magee Mine of the Westmoreland Coal Company, located in Sewickley Township, across the Sewickley Creek from coal company patch town of Yukon, in South Huntingdon Township, Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania ca.1908.
(Photo courtesy of Arthur Wilson and the Tribune-Review, Greensburg, PA 10 October, 1985)

Location Magee Mine
U.S.G.S. Topographic Quadrangle Map, Smithton, PA  NW/4 Connellsville 7.5 min. Quadrangle, ca.1954.
The Magee Mine is shown as active in 1954.  The Map shows the location of the Magee Mine, showing two mine entres (the little arrow type figures), tipple and the Yukon Branch of the Pennsylvania Railroad serving the mine.

(Map courtesy of the U.S. Geological Survey, Washington, D.C.)

Building the Portal
The concrete forms shown here were used in the construction of the double entry portal for the Magee Mine.
(Photo courtesy of Prof. Herman J. Preseren, Winston-Salem, N.C.)

Westmoreland Coal Company Officials, ca.1909
A group of Westmoreland Coal Company officials at the opening ceremony  for the still uncompleted Magee Mine complex in ca.1909.  The Magee Mine Boiler House, Engine House, and tipple are in the background.
(Photo courtesy of Edith B. Mitcheel , Yukon, PA and from Prof. Herman J. Preseren, Winston-Salem, N.C.)

Magee Mine Complex in the early years
A cable supported Foot-bridge over Sewickley Creek provided the miners access to the Westmoreland Coal Company Magee Mine complex in Sewickley Township which was located across Sewickley Creek from the coal patch town of Yukon, South Huntingdon Township in it's early days. The Pennsylvania Railroad Yukon Branch coal loading tracks run under the large coal tipple.
(Photo courtesy of the Tribune Review, Greensburg, PA)

Magee Mine Complex in later years
The Magee Mine Complex in its later years.  The foot bridge has been replaced with a concrete bridge for vehicle traffic, but the mine complex hasn't changed much.   
(Photo courtesy of Prof. Herman J. Preseren, Winston-Salem, N.C.)

Company Office Building, Magee Mine
Mr. Miller, is second from left of the group of office workers at the Magee Mine in Yukon.
(Photo courtesy Mrs. Martha Miller and The News Dispatch, Jan. 5, 1977)

DESCRIPTION: Magee Mine Complex:
Magee Mine, or as the locals called it "Maggie Mine," at Yukon is located on the northern border of Sewickley Creek in Sewickley Township and on the former Yukon Branch of the Pennsylvania Railroad.  A number of distinctive stone buildings remain in place though they are poor condition, having been abandoned and are deteriorating.  These impressive ashlar sandstone structures that formed the colliery at Yukon are unlike any other mine buildings in the region.  The largest of these buildings at Yukon is the powerhouse.  Located along the abandoned Pennsylvania Railroad right-of-way, the powerhouse contained a boiler room and an engine room. The boiler room is housed in a tall one-story section of the building with ashlar sandstone walls and large arched windows at the floor level and above at an upper level.  It contains a concrete and earth floor and riveted steel trusses supporting a hipped roof and monitor.  Adjoining the boiler room to the west is the engine room, a one-story ashlar sandstone building with a brick floor, a gable roof, and arched windows.  The powerhouse measures 150 ft. x 50 ft.  The building rests on a stone foundation. All of the power-generating and boiler equipment have been removed, ca.1993.  Two tall iron chimney stacks that stood next to the boiler room along the north side of the building have also been removed.

Located to the east, on the bank of Sewickley Creek, the hoist house is a tall one-story ashlar sandstone building with a full basement;  its slate roof with frame monitor has partially collapsed (ca.1994), though the riveted steel Fink trusses remain.  The building measures 48 ft.x 44 ft. and contains a circular window at the gable end, tall arched windows, and a stone foundation.  A stone marker at the gable end proclaims "WCCO 1908."  None of the hoisting machinery remains in the building.  Adjacent to the hoist house is a one-story red-brick building that housed electrical equipment used in conjunction with the electric-powered hoist.  A large wood-frame tramway and coal loading tipple once stood between the powerhouse and the hoist house.  It extended over the Pennsylvania Railroad tracks but was demolished after the mine was closed and abandoned.
The Hoist House
ca.1994
Magee Mine

Magee Mine, The interior of the Magee Mine Hoist House, as it looked, ca.1994.
(Photo by Jet Lowe, courtesy of Historic American Building Survey / Historic American Engineering Record, HABS/HAER, America's Industrial Heritage Project, National Park Service, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.)

About 150 ft. north of the powerhouse is the machine shop, a tall one-story ashlar sandstone building that measures 65 ft. x 46 ft..  It has a hipped-roof covered with slate, and a gable-roof monitor. The roof system was supported by riveted steel Fink trusses, which have collapsed.  Still remaining are the stone walls and the arched windows.

West of the machine shop was the entrance to the Magee Mine.  Ashlar sandstone retaining walls lead to the double-portal  slope-entry.  Spanning each portal is a massive ashlar sandstone lintel.  Standing near the mine entrance, ca.1994, is a battery-powered locomotive.  The locomotive dates from the 1950's and is in fair condition.

About 50 ft. south of the machine shop is the office and supply building.  It is a one-story ashlar sandstone structure and measures 27 ft. x 17 ft.. it has been partially destroyed by a fire but retains its arched window openings.  The roof is missing and the interior is exposed to the elements.

The cap house is a small one-story common-bond red-brick building.  It measures 12 ft. x 12 ft. and contains a gable roof, covered with sheet metal, and a concrete foundation.  Near the cap house is a small one-story wood-frame building with board-and-batten siding. Its gable roof is covered with slate.  A lamphouse, of common-bond red-brick construction with hipped slate roof and cupola, once stood near the powerhouse but has recently, ca.1993, been demolished.  Many archaeological features and stone walls are present in the complex.  After the mine closed is 1954, the site was converted to an automobile repair shop and a junk yard.  All structures are now abandoned and deteriorating.  No machinery is extant.

Magee Mine Complex
Magee Mine Complex (ca.1994), the boiler house and engine house are to the left, and the hoist house, with the round window in the peak of the roof,  is to the right.  The Concrete piers in the center of the picture, between the two buildings, supported the coal tipple which was built over the coal loading tracks of the PRR  The Bridge abutments in the foreground supported the Yukon Branch of the Pennsylvania Railroad tracks over Sewickley Creek.
(Photo by Jet Lowe, courtesy of Historic American Building Survey / Historic American Engineering Record, HABS/HAER, America's Industrial Heritage Project, National Park Service, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.)

Magee Mine Complex
Magee Mine Complex (ca.1994), the boiler house and engine house are to the left, and the hoist house is to the right.  The concrete piers and foundations in the center of the picture, between the two buildings, supported the coal loading tipple, which was built over the loading tracks of the Pennsylvania Railroad.  The Bridge abutments in the foreground supported the several tracks of the Yukon Branch of the Pennsylvania Railroad over Sewickley Creek.
(Photo by Jet Lowe, courtesy of Historic American Building Survey / Historic American Engineering Record, HABS/HAER, America's Industrial Heritage Project, National Park Service, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.)

HISTORY:
Magee Mine was a slope entry mine, opened by the Westmoreland Coal Company in 1908, the mine was named after James Magee, President of the Westmoreland Coal Company, 1856-1857, and member of the coal company's original board of directors.  The company developed this collery in Sewickley Township, Westmoreland County and built a group of company houses for its workers across Sewickley Creek in the nearby Village of Yukon, in South Huntingdon Township.

In 1909 Westmoreland Coal Company built eleven brick overcasts and sixty concrete stoppings in the Magee Mine.

Coal was extracted from the 81 inch thick Pittsburgh Coal seam.  By 1910 the Westmoreland Coal Company employed 443 persons at its Magee Mine.  Superintendent E.G. Smith resided in one of the larger company-built houses in Yukon.

In 1910 workers at the Magee Mine produced nearly 429,000 tons of coal, almost all of which was shipped to market via the Yukon Branch of the Pennsylvania Railroad.  The company employed eighty miners, 235 machine loaders, and thirty-two mules and horses to haul coal from the working area of the mine.

In 1919 the Magee Mine produced 426,984 tons of coal, the mine operated 291 days, and employed 365 men, there were 2 fatal accidents in 1919, and 5 non-fatal accidents.

The United Mine Workers of America Yukon Local No.562 represented the miners at the Magee Mine.

Dr.Toth, the coal company doctor, was one of the most revered and respected citizens in Yukon. He and his wife served the miners and their families beginning in 1926 for thirty plus years. While Dr. Toth attended to the patients in the office at his home and made house calls, Helen Toth ran a small pharmacy there. It seemed as if the Doctor and his wife felt it was their mission in life to care for the miners and their families in Yukon and the surrounding mining communities.

Magee Mine Trolley Locomotive
A Magee Mine battery powered electric trolley locomotive sits abandoned, ca.1994, near the Magee Mine entrance.
(Photo by Jet Lowe, courtesy of Historic American Building Survey / Historic American Engineering Record, HABS/HAER, America's Industrial Heritage Project, National Park Service, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.)

Improvements made in 1939
In 1939 extensive improvements of the surface equipment at the Magee Mine were completed.  It was provided with the most modern facilities for cleaning, classifying and segregating the output of the mine into various sizes, or any combination of sizes required.

Closing of the Magee Mine
By 1940 the work force had been reduced to 275 miners producing about 328,000 tons of coal.  At the time the mine used eleven trolley locomotives to haul the coal from the mine, although the firm was still using about twenty-nine horses and mules. A coal preparation plant was built at the Magee Mine complex, with water for the coal washer supplied from a reservoir constructed on the creek in nearby Lower Whyel. The used coal washer water from the preparation plant was then pumped directly into Sewickley Creek.

Mining operations at the  Magee Mine of the Pittsburgh Consolidation Coal Company ceased in ca.1954, and the mine complex was abandoned.

There have been various local unconfirmed rumors over the years since the closing of the Magee Mine that the Waltz Mill plant used the abandoned mine tunnels of the Magee Mine to dispose of various waste materials.  This was once mentioned on a DEP web site, which seems to be no longer online.

(History and description of the Magee Mine, with additional data and pictures adapted from "Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania: An Inventory of Historic Engineering and Industrial Sites, 1994,"  America's Industrial Heitage Project, National Park Service, Historic American Buildings Survey / Historic American Engineering Record, U.S. Department of the Interior, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.)

"Coal Miners Memorial, Magee Mine,
Yukon, Sewickley Township, Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania"
"Coal Company Patch Town, Yukon,
Sewickley Township, Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania"
To Select another Index
to Westmoreland County Coal Mines
Click on the Larry cars for Index Page
or on a Letter below
Select another Index to Westmoreland County Mines


or
Go to Top of Page

Select another Index to Coal Mines of Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

Local History Sites
Links to other coal mining sites
Reference Sources for Southwestern Pennsylvania  Coal Mines The New Message Boards have not worked, Use our guestbook for questions Have information to add on Westmoreland County Coal Mines?
E-Mail the Editor
View the
"Old Miner's"
Guestbook
Let the Old Miner know you've been here.
Sign the
"Old Miner's"
Guestbook
Guestbook by GuestWorld

FastCounter by LinkExchange
Mercers, an Undertakers Business - Web Productions If you have additional information or pictures on the Coal Mines of Westmoreland County, PA
Contact: Ray Washlaski, Editor

Copyright 2008, All rights reserved, by Raymond A. Washlaski, Ryan P. Washlaski & The 20th Century Society of Western Pennsylvania.
Web site Design by "Mercers, an Undertakers" Web Design Company

[an error occurred while processing this directive]