Mine buggy - Virtual Museum of Coal Mining in Western Pennsylvania
Virtual Museum of Coal Mining in Western Pennsylvania

Digital Coal Research Library
The 20th Century Society of Western Pennsylvania
Links to:
Return to the Main County Index for Southwestern Pennsylvania Coal Mines


Coal Miners Memorial Eleanora Mines & Coke Works, Eleanora, McCalmont Twp., Jefferson Co., PA


Coal Mines of Jefferson Co., PA, Main Index

Eleanora No. 1 Mine & Coke Works,
Eleanora No. 2 Mine,
Eleanora No. 3 Mine,

Eleanora,
McCalmont Twp.,
Jefferson County,
Pennsylvania, U.S.A.

A Tribute to the Coal Miners that mined the Bituminous Coal seams of the Eleanora Mines, Jefferson County, Pennsylvania, U.S.A.

Compiled & Edited by
Raymond A. Washlaski

Raymond A. Washlaski, Historian, Editor,
Ryan P. Washlaski, Technical Editor,

Updated June 11, 2010

Search our web sites total data base!
Enter a Miner's last name, Coal Mine name, or Coal Company Name.
A single name works best.
powered by FreeFind

Eleanora Mines (Eleanor P.O.), McCalmont Twp., Jefferson Co., PA
[A coal company patch town in McCalmont Twp., Jefferson County, Pennsylvania.]
[Eleanora was named after Eleanora Iselin, wife of Adrian Iselin who owned the Rochester and Pittsburgh Coal and Iron Company.]
[The Eleanora Shaft Mine was opened in ca.1894 and closed in ca.1919. Eleanora was a small town but there was a trolley that stopped there and there were businesses and churches. For the most part Eleanora was a coal company patch town existing because of the mine. When the mines closed, the town disappeared. Almost nothing remains ca.2006.]
See: Eleanora No. 1 Mine (Eleanora Shaft Mine), Eleanora, McCalmont Twp., Jefferson Co., PA
        Eleanora No. 2 Mine, Eleanora, McCalmont Twp., Jefferson Co., PA
        Eleanora No. 3 Mine, Eleanora, McCalmont Twp., Jefferson Co., PA

Eleanor P.O. (Eleanora Mines), McCalmont Twp., Jefferson Co., PA
[A coal company patch town in McCalmont Twp., Jefferson County, Pennsylvania.]
See: Eleanora No. 1 Mine, Eleanora Mines, McCalmont Twp., Jefferson Co., PA
        Eleanora No. 2 Mine, Eleanora Mines, McCalmont Twp., Jefferson Co., PA
        Eleanora No. 3 Mine, Eleanora Mines, McCalmont Twp., Jefferson Co., PA
        Eleanor Shaft Mine, Eleanora Mines, McCalmont Twp., Jefferson Co., PA

Eleanora No. 1 Mine
(Eleanora Shaft Mine)
(ca.1889-1919),
Located on the Buffalo, Rochester & Pittsburg Railroad, and the Punxsutawney Electric Railway, Eleanora Mines, Eleanora P.O., McCalmont Twp., Jefferson Co., PA
[Disasters - on April 27, 1905 an explosion in the Eleanora Mine killed 13 miners.]
Owners: (ca.1901-  ?  ), Rochester & Pittsburg Coal & Iron Company, Punxsutawney, PA
             (ca.1905-  ?  ), Rochester & Pittsburg Coal & Iron Company, Punxsutawney, PA

Eleanora No. 2 Mine (ca.1890-  ?  ),
Located on the Buffalo, Rochester & Pittsburg Railroad, and the Punxsutawney Electric Railway, Eleanora Mines, Eleanora P.O., McCalmont Twp., Jefferson Co., PA
Owners: (ca.1901-  ?  ), Rochester & Pittsburg Coal & Iron Company, Punxsutawney, PA
             (ca.1905-  ?  ), Rochester & Pittsburg Coal & Iron Company, Punxsutawney, PA

Eleanora No. 3 Mine & Coke Works (ca.1901-  ?  ),
Located on the Buffalo, Rochester & Pittsburg Railroad, and the Punxsutawney Electric Railway, Eleanora Mines, Eleanora P.O.,  McCalmont Twp., Jefferson Co., PA
[Eleanora No. 3 Coke Works contained 201 bee-hive coke ovens ca.1901.]
Owners: (ca.1901-  ?  ), Rochester & Pittsburg Coal & Iron Company, Punxsutawney, PA
             (ca.1905-  ?  ), Rochester & Pittsburg Coal & Iron Company, Punxsutawney, PA

Bulldog Mine (ca.1923-1930), Located at one of the original mine shafts at Eleanora Mines, Eleanora, Jefferson Co., PA

The top map is a portion of the U.S.G.S. 15 min. DuBois quad map ca.1924ed. The bottom map is a portion of the U.S.G.S. 15min. Punxsutawney quad map ca.1906ed.  The two maps combined show the Eleanora Branch of the Buffalo, Rochester & Pittsburgh Railroad.  Eleanora and Big Run were also served by the Jefferson County Electric Railway system.
(Courtesy of the U.S. Geological Survey, Washington, D.C.

Sketch map of the Adrian Mines & the Eleanora Mines ca.1896.
(Courtesy of "Rochester & Pittsburgh Coal Company, The First One Hundred Years" by Eileen Mountjoy Cooper, ca.1982.)

HISTORY:
In December, 1889, the Board of Directors of the Rochester & Pittsburgh Coal & Iron Company completed transactions securing the purchase of still more coal lands.  This entailed "the purchase of certain lands, coal rights, and coal situated in Jefferson County, known as 'Eleanora Property.' "  The purchase price totalled $350.000 in Company bonds.  The minng town of Eleanora, named in honor of the wife of Adrian Iselin, came into existance in December, 1887, but work at the location proceeded slowly until the company's purchase of the lands from the Iselin family.

Construction of miners' houses and support buildings for the new community began in February, 1888, and by the next year were completed.

In December, 1889, yet, another string of coke ovens appeared on the landscape of Jefferson County, this time at Eleanora, named in honor of the wife of Adrian Iselin, Sr. Construction of the 80 houses for the new community began in February, 1888, and by the end of the next year, they were fully occupied. Within months, the ovens at the Eleanora were producing 100,000 tons of coke annually. This tonnage, combined with that of Walston Coke Works and Adrian Coke Works, found a ready market in the developing iron and steel industry along the Great Lakes. Coke from Jefferson Country was particularly suited to foundry use, and markets for it extended as far west as the Mississippi River. Still more shipments traveled, by rails, as far as Chicago.

An overview of Eleanora, PA founded ca.1887, showing the various styles of housing built by the Rochester & Pittsburgh Coal & Iron Company in the town.  The large building center right probably is the company store.  The railroad tracks of the Buffalo, Rochester & Pittsburgh Railroad can be seen center left.  Nothing of this town remains ca.2008.
(Courtesy of "Rochester & Pittsburgh Coal Company, The First One Hundred Years" by Eileen Mountjoy Cooper, ca.1982.)

The Rochester & Pittsburgh Coal & Iron Company made its first shipment from the Eleanora Mine in December, 1889.  In ca.1890 the inspector of Mines noted in his annual report for the State of Pennsylvania that the Eleanora No. 1 Mine, although a new one, "was in first-class condition as to draining and ventilation."  The plan adopted for this mine, with separate and fresh air for each heading or section of work, was "the only true and proper method of ventilating mines,"  The inspector concluded in his report that "until this plan is universally adopted, ventilation and drainage will not be what they should by in regard to healthfulness for men,"

Eleanora Mine output for the first full year of production was listed at 143,607 tons of coal.  By ca.1894 Eleanora No. 1 Mine and Eleanora No. 2 Mine were being mined by mining machines of the Ingersoll-Sergeant compressed air type.  To furnish the air to operate the machines, teo Norwalk Compressors were installed by Heyl & Patterson Company of Pittsburgh, PA.  These cutting machines eliminated a great deal of pick work in under cutting the coal.  Mules, of cource, were still used to transport the empty mine cars fromthe slope to the face, and to return the loaded mine cars to the slope and then they were pulled to the tipple.

The tipple of Eleanora No. 2 Mine and power house to the right.  Buffalo, Rochester & Pittsburgh Railroad cars loaded with coal are awaiting shipment.
(Photo courtesy of the Jefferson County Historical Society, Brookville, PA.)

Miners and outside workers with loaded mine cars outside the Eleanora Mine.
(Photo courtesy of the Jefferson County Historical Society, Brookville, PA.)

By ca.1898, Eleanora Mines also had bee-hive coke ovens and produced 100,164 tons of coke that year.  For the period ended December 31, 1898, Eleanora Mines produced 232,123 tons of coal, and the total number of men and boys employed had grown to 902.  Two years later the minng town of Eleanora contained approximately 89 miners houses, and an independent town named Desire developed nearby in Henderson Twp. to house the population overflow from the main community.

A disaster occurred at the Eleanora Shaft Mine, April 27, 1905, an explosion in which 13 miners were killed.

From the Inspector of Mnes of Pennsylvania Report for 1906.
Eleanora Nos. 1 and No. 2 Mines were found in good condition.  In Eleanora No. 2 Mine they are pushing the heading toward the shaft night and day.  They meet with difficulties in the way of water, and sometimes rolls.  This heading is going to the dip, and when connection is made with the heading from the shaft the water will drain to that point.  Since the strike Eleanora No. 3 Mine has not worked, the men having been transferred to Eleanora No. 2 Mine.

In ca.1906 the Eleanora Mines produced 476,026 tons of coal and 55, 394 tons of coke and employed 657 men and boys and 29 horses and mules.
(Historical text adapted from "Rochester & Pittsburgh Coal Company, The First One Hundred Years" by Eileen Mountjoy Cooper, ca.1982.  used with permission of Eileen Mountjoy.)

from "The DuBois Courier," DuBois, PA, Aug. 15, 1930

43 Year-Old Eleanora Mine To Be Abandoned At Once

Notwithstanding the fact that there is sufficient coal remaining to maintain operations for 20 or 30 years, the plant of the Rochester & Pittsburgh Coal Company at Eleanora is to be abandoned.

Orders have been given for the withdrawal of pumps and equipment for the dismanting of the houses remaining in the town, and for the tearing up of the railroad running into the plant from Big Run.

Ira S, Smith, who has been operating the "Bulldog" mine at Eleanora since the shutting down of the larger operation, has said his interest in the plant, to the parent coal company, and work there will becessarily be suspended.  About fifty men had employment with Mr. Smith.

The larger operation of the company has not worked for about seven years.  It closed during the dispute over the payment of tje Jacksonville scale and had never run since.  In this sence the present orders will have little direst effect now, for the flow of money from that source ended long ago.  It is only as it affects the future employment in that region that it is threatening.

Eleanora was first opened in 1887 and was for many years one of the largest mines in this part of the state.  It gave employment at one time to over 1,000 men.  Many of the houses there were owned by the company, but there were also many privately built.  It brought properity to the farmers roundabout also.  It was the largest of the three mining towns of that section --Wishaw, Desire and Eleanora, the first to be established and the last to be abandoned.

There has been a persistent rumor that an opening is to be made at the lower end of Big Run by which the coal is to be removed.  Development may confirm this belief.  It is stated that it would be much less expensive to take coal out through a new shaft.
[from "The DuBois Courier," BuBois, PA, Aug. 15, 1930.]

from the "Looking Back" column of the "DuBois Courier-Express," DuBois, Pa, Friday, June 8, 2007.

Thursday, June 6, 1907
Eleanora and Desire Being Abandoned
Eleanora and Desire are not of the importance which they once were.  These towns lying as they do on the line of the trolley nearly midway between Reynoldsville and Punxsutawney, at one time gave much trade to the two towns named. Now, it is said, they scarcely mine twenty-five percent of the coal tonnage which they once did. The people are moving away and the houses are standing idle.
[from "Looking Back" column of the DuBois Courier-Express, Friday, June 8, 2007.]

Today, only a very few houses remain at the site of Eleanora.

The bee-hive coke oven battery at Eleanora Mines with the town of Eleanora in the background.
(Photo courtesy of the Jefferson County Historical Society, Brookville, PA.)

Coal Miners Memorial Eleanora Mines & Coke Works,
Eleanora, McCalmont Twp., Jefferson Co., PA

Support the Coal & Coke Heritage Center, a non-profit research center and museum.
Want to know more about the women who lived in the coal patch towns?  You need this book.  One of the few studies done on the women of the coal & coke era.
Common lives of Uncommon Strength:
The Women of the Coal & Coke Era of Southwestern Pennsylvania 1880-1970
Complied, written and edited by: Evelyn A. Hovanec, PhD   227 pages.
Voices of the women tell unique stores of the coal and coke era, plus vintage photographs, documents, maps, and newspaper articles.  Hardcover $35.00  Soft cover $25.00  Add $5.00 shipping / handling.
Send Check or money order to:
Coal & Coke Heritage Center, Penn State University Fayette Campus
P.O. Box 519, Uniontown, PA  15401

To Select another Index
to Westmoreland County Coal Mines
Click on the Larry cars for Index Page
or on a Letter below
Select another Index to Westmoreland County Mines


or
Go to Top of Page

Select another Index to Coal Mines of Jefferson County, Pennsylvania
[Click on a letter to take you to that Index]
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

Return to the Main County Index for Southwest Pennsylvania Coal Mines

Local History Sites
Links to other coal mining sites
Reference Sources for Southwestern Pennsylvania Coal Mines The New Message Boards have not worked, Use our guestbook.  Email the Editor. Have information to add on Jefferson County Coal Mines?
E-Mail the Editor
View the
"Old Miner's"
Guestbook
Let the Old Miner know you've been here.
Sign the
"Old Miner's"
Guestbook
Guestbook by GuestWorld

FastCounter by LinkExchange
Mercers, an Undertakers Business - Web Productions If you have additional information or pictures on the Coal Mines of Jefferson County, PA
Contact: Ray Washlaski, Editor

Copyright 2008, All rights reserved, by Raymond A. Washlaski, Ryan P. Washlaski & The 20th Century Society of Western Pennsylvania.
Web site Design by "Mercers, an Undertakers" Web Design Company