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Coal Miners Memorial Adrian Mines & Coke Works, Adrian, Delancey P.O., Young Twp., Jefferson Co., PA


Coal Mines of Jefferson Co., PA, Main Index

Adrian No. 1 Mine & Coke Works,
Adrian No. 2 Mine,
Adrian No. 3 Mine,
Adrian No. 4 Mine,
Adrian No. 5 Mine,

Adrian (Delancey P.O.),
Young Twp.,
Jefferson County,
Pennsylvania, U.S.A.

A Tribute to the Coal Miners that mined the Bituminous Coal seams of the Adrian Mines, Jefferson County, Pennsylvania, U.S.A.

Compiled & Edited by
Raymond A. Washlaski

Raymond A. Washlaski, Historian, Editor,
Ryan P. Washlaski, Technical Editor,

Updated June 23, 2010

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Adrian (Delancey P.O.), Young Twp., Jefferson Co., PA
[A coal company patch town in Young Twp., Jefferson County, Pennsylvania.]
[Located on the Punxsutawney Electric Railway, Adrian Branch of the Buffalo, Rochester & Pittsburgh Railway, and on the Adrian Branch of the Pennsylvania Railroad, Adrian, Delancey P.O., Young Twp., Jefferson Co., PA.]
See: Adrian No. 1 Mine, Adrian / Delancy, Young Twp., Jefferson Co., PA
       Adrian No. 2 Mine, Adrian / Delancy, Young Twp., Jefferson Co., PA
       Adrian No. 3 Mine, Adrian / Delancy, Young Twp., Jefferson Co., PA
       Adrian No. 4 Mine, Adrian / Delancy, Young Twp., Jefferson Co., PA

Adrian No. 1 Mine & Coke Works (ca.1887-  ?  ),
Located on the Adrian Branch of the Buffalo, Rochester & Pittsburgh Railway, and on the Adrian Branch of the Pennsylvania Railroad, Adrian, Delancey P.O., Young Twp., Jefferson Co., PA
[Adrian, which is situated on Elk Run, is also about two miles from Punxsutawney, and was commenced in 1887, and now contains about five hundred of a population, fifty houses (double blocks), one store, four hundred and fifty coke ovens, one fan house, one drift and one slope.  "Adrian mines now have 700 coke ovens building. The company will have 1,500 coke ovens running by the close of this year." (from "History of Jefferson County" With Illustrations and Biographical Sketches of Some its Prominent Men and Pioneers. Edited by Kate M. Scott, Syracuse, N.Y.; D. Mason & Co. 1888.).]
[Adrian Mines Coke Works contained 511 bee-hive coke ovens ca.1906.]
[Adrian Coke Works contained 511 bee-hive coke ovens arranged in a double row and mile long ca.1903.]
[Disaster - Nov. 9, 1911, Adrian No. 1 Mine of the Rochester & Pittsburgh Coal Co. Punxsutawney, PA , 8 miners were killed in an explosion.]

[Coal Company Store, Mahoning Supply Company.]
Owners: (ca.1886- ?   ), Bell, Lewis, & Yates Mining Company,
             (ca.1896- ?   ), Rochester & Pittsburg Coal & Iron Company, Punxsutawney, PA
             (ca.1901-  ?  ), Rochester & Pittsburgh Coal & Iron Company,
                                    Punxsutawney, PA
             (ca.1904-  ?  ), Rochester & Pittsburgh Coal & Iron Company,
                                    Punxsutawney, PA
             (ca.1905-  ?  ), Rochester & Pittsburgh Coal & Iron Company,
                                    Punxsutawney, PA
            (ca.1925-   ?  ), Jefferson & Indiana Coal Company, Indiana, PA

Adrian No. 2 Mine (ca.1901-  ?  ),
Located on the Adrian Branch of the Buffalo, Rochester & Pittsburgh Railway, and the Punxsutawney Electric Railroad, Adrian, Delancey P.O., Young Twp., Jefferson Co., PA
Owners: (ca.1901-  ?  ), Rochester & Pittsburgh Coal & Iron Company,
                                    Punxsutawney, PA
             (ca.1904-  ?  ), Rochester & Pittsburgh Coal & Iron Company,
                                    Punxsutawney, PA

Adrian No. 3 Mine (ca.1901-  ?  ),
Located on the Adrian Branch of the Buffalo, Rochester & Pittsburgh Railway, Adrian, Delancey P.O., Young Twp., Jefferson Co., PA
Owners: (ca.1901-  ?  ), Rochester & Pittsburgh Coal & Iron Company,
                                    Punxsutawney, PA
             (ca.1904-  ?  ), Rochester & Pittsburgh Coal & Iron Company,
                                    Punxsutawney, PA

Adrian No. 4 Mine (ca.1901-  ?  ),
Located on the Adrian Branch of the Buffalo, Rochester & Pittsburgh Railway, Adrian, Delancey P.O., Young Twp., Jefferson Co., PA
Owners: (ca.1901-  ?  ), S. A. Rinn Company, Punxsutawney, PA

Adrian No. 5 Mine (ca.1901-  ?  ),
Located on the Adrian Branch of the Buffalo, Rochester & Pittsburgh Railway, Adrian, Delancey P.O., Young Twp., Jefferson Co., PA
Owners: (ca.1901-  ?  ), S. A. Rinn Company, Punxsutawney, PA

A portion of the Punxsutawney, PA 15 min. quad. map ca.1906, showing Adrian and the railroads that served the Adrian Mines and coke works.
(Courtesy of the U.S. Geological Survey, Washington, D.C.)

Sketch map of the Adrian Mines & the Eleanora Mines ca.1896.
(Courtesy of "Rochester & Pittsburgh Coal Company, The First One Hundred Years" by Eileen Mountjoy Cooper, ca.1982.)

The wooden Tipple at the Adrian Mines, Adrian, Young Township, Jefferson Co., Pennsylvania, ca.1912.
(Photo courtesy of the "Indiana Gazette," Jan, 8, 2006.  From the collections of John Busovicki, Clymer, PA.)

HISTORY:
Adrian George Iselin purchased the Rochester and Pittsburgh Coal and Iron Company in ca.1885.  In ca.1886 the Rochester & Pittsburg Coal & Iron Company formulated plans for the opening of another new mine at a location in Young Township, two miles from Punxsutawney.  Both the proposed mine and the town planned for the site were named "Adrian," after Adrian George Iselin's grandson Adrian Iselin II.  By September, 1886. laborers armed with picks and shovels completed the opening of Adrian No. 1 Mine.  In preparation for shipping coal, the wooden mine cars were brought over from the Beechtree Mine on the newly extended line of the Buffalo, Rochester & Pittsburg Railroad.  The new mine at Adrian made its initial coal shipment in January, 1887.

As the Rochester & Pittsburg Coal & Iron Company developed the mines in and around the site of Adrian, plans for the new town were drawn up and put into action.  In October, 1886, crews of carpenters began working on double and single houses in Adrian.  By May of the following year, a painter named J. L. Greene went door-to-door in the new town and painted a number on each of the 200 homes.  Late in June, workmen laid wooden sidewalks and built fences around the dwellings.  A schoolhouse and a visiting doctor added finishing touches to the mining community.

As coal and coke production grew steadily at Walston, the officers of the R&P C&I formulated plans for the opening of another mew mining and coking plant in Young Township, two miles from Punxsutawney. The mines at the site appropriately named, "Adrian" in honor of chief investor Adrian Iselin, made its first shipment in January 1887.

A visitor to the area during that a time, although impressed with the area 180-ton-s-per-day capacity of the crusher, noted, presumably with enthusiasm, "this will soon be a very smoke city." The town of Adrian, built "upon a gentle hill," quickly assumed a completed appearance as churches, a school and a company store were added to the blocks of red-painted houses.

An eye witness has left us this visual image of Adrian as it appeared in 1887.

Adrian is a very pretty town for a coal town.  It stands upon a gentle hill.  The houses are all of the same styled architecture, Corinthian, and look so much alike that it is impossible to tell which is the most alike.  Now we have frequently heard of people painting a town red, but the Rochester & Pittsburgh Coal & Iron Company is perhaps the first individual or organization to carry this out literally, and actually paint a whole town red.

By ca.1888, Lucius Waterman Robinson had progressed from Tioga County to Jefferson County, where he was superintendent of the gigantic Rochester Mine near Dubois, owned by Bell, Lewis, & Yates Mining Company. When the Rochester & Pittsburg Coal & Iron Company purchased all of the mines of the Bell, Lewis &Yates Company in ca.1896, Lucius W. Robinson had been a director of the Rochester & Pittsburg Coal & Iron Company for five years. Therefor, at the time of the purchase, L. W. Robinson turned all of his attention to the success of the larger company.

As superintendent of the Rochester Mine, Lucius W. Robinson's engineering skills were put to use in the maintenance of the remarkable rope haulage system that hauled coal from underground to the surface. The rope haulage, which utilized four drums powered by two large steam engines, was a highly complicated but very efficient means of hauling coal outside and up into the tipple, and returning the empties underground. When necessary, as many as 50 cars could be handled at one time. Mining engineers from all over the United States and Europe traveled to Dubois to see the rope haulage system in operation.

Heath Clark, president of Rochester & Pittsburg Coal Company from 1933 to 1948, wrote:
One of the marvels of the Rochester Mine's rope haulage system was that only one man was needed to operate it. Only three employees of the company knew how to operate it. Among them was Lucius Waterman Robinson, one-time superintendent of the mine. It is history that Mr. Robinson, while president of the R&P C&I, actually did man the hoist for several days while a majority of the miners struck for higher wages.

During his long career in the mining industry, colleagues and adversaries alike often experienced the forcefulness of Lucius W. Robinson's personality. One of the earliest stories about him is recorded in the private papers of S. B. Elliott, general manager of Bell, Lewis & Yates at the time of this incident in 1896:

On the 23rd of March, 1896 there was an accident in the Adrian Mine, north of Punxsutawney, whereby two men were overcome by gas, but were finally resuscitated. Among the latter was Edwin Robinson, Lucius W. Robinson's brother. It appears that a fire occurred in the mine on Sunday night, and the fire gave injury to the boss and mining boss who had been endeavoring to put it out. Edwin came there just at the dawn of day, and insisted on going in where it was dangerous. He had been warned against it, but he persisted and was overcome, together with two companions who were with him. Others went in to their rescue, but were unable to get them out, except that Mr. Lucius Waterman Robinson himself went in and got Edwin out, and some other parties went in and carried the mine foreman out, and the other man, who was brought to life after several hours. Edwin Robinson was unconscious a less length of time.

Happily, Edwin Robinson recovered and eventually became the chief engineer of the Buffalo, Rochester & Pittsburg Railroad. His brother, Lucius Robinson, went on to lead the Rochester & Pittsburgh Coal & Iron Company into great expansion of both production and coal reserves.

In ca.1899, another mine opening, Florence No. 1 Mine, was begun northeast of Adrian.  Shortly thereafter Florence No. 2 Mine was begun. Both Florence No. 1 Mine and Florence No. 2 Mine were operated by the Rochester & Pittsburgh Coal & Iron Company until ca.1924, when the mines were closed.  The company reopened Florence Mine in ca.1937 and mined coal again at the site until ca.1941, when the operation was permanently shut down.  All coal mined at the Florence Mines was transported back to Adrian and processed over Adrian's tipple.  Most of the men who mined at Florence No. 1 Mine & Flornece3 No. 2 Mine lived in Adrian, although a few house were eventually built at Florence for the convenience of some of the workers.

George Iselin's wife, Eleanora had the St. Adrian's Catholic Church built. A pipe organ was installed in that church in ca.1890. Adrian Iselin had a Protestant church built in Adrian. The name Eleanora was given to another coal town a few miles north of Adrian. The name Iselin was given to a mining town in Indiana County.

St. Adrian's Church in Adrian, Jefferson Co., Pennsylvania was built by Eleanora O'Donnell Iselin for the Mining town of Adrian.
(Photo courtesy of the Special Collections Section, IUP Library, Indiana University of Pennsylvania, Indiana, PA)

A view of the Adrian Mines and the new town of Adrian on the gentle hills beyond.  The large building, on the right center, looks like the coal company store for the town.
(Photo courtesy of the Jefferson County Historical Society, Brookville, PA.)

A view of the Adrian Mines and the new town of Adrian on the gentle hills beyond.  The large building, on the right center, looks like the coal company store for the town.
(Photo courtesy of the Jefferson County Historical Society, Brookville, PA.)

A view of the Adrian Mines and the new town of Adrian on the gentle hills beyond.
(Photo courtesy of the Jefferson County Historical Society, Brookville, PA.)

As the town of Adrian neared completion, the Adrian Coke Works joined the Walston Coke Works in the production of coke.  In October, 1886, laborers began a battery of bee-hive coke ovens at the Adrian Mine.  Outside workmen built track to the doors of the coke ovens using 22 tons of old rails from an unused section of the Buffalo, Rochester & Pittsburgh Railroad.

At the time a local newspaper reported that "the coke works at Adrian, on the Elk Run will be 500 ovens strong. The building of the ovens will commence at once. This will make around 1,000 coke ovens in the vicinity of Punxsutawney." And, by June 15, 1887, another paper announced, "under the direction of J.M. Murphy, 125 more ovens have been completed at Adrian, and more are being constructed every day. The building of beehive coke ovens continued at Adrian until a total of 550 was reached. Shortly thereafter, a coke crusher was erected near the lower end of the western row of ovens. The addition of the crushing facility produced a higher price on the market.  

More coke ovens were constructed in March and April, 1887.  To complete the entire string of coke ovens, the Company purchased over $7,000 worth of brick from a firm named Gisssen and Kilpatrick.

The men who worked at Adrian's coke ovens and mines brought all their families' needs at the Company-owned store.  In the late 1880's, H. P. Brown, one of the first directors of the Coal & Iron Company, operated stores in each of the three original R. & P C & I towns.  Large boarding bills at the Beechtree Hotel paid by Brown for the care of his horse indicate that he lived there while supervising his business establishments.  Brown's storebooks and voucher records, meticulously kept, help give us an impression of everyday life in mining communities before the turn of the century.

Miners and their families shopped daily at Brown's company stores.  The stores sold furniture brought in on the Buffalo Rochester & Pittsburg Railroad from a Buffalo manufacture, overalls, suspenders from the Wire Buckle Suspender Company, stoves from the South Erie Iron Works, and even baby carriages from a company named Francis L. Hughes and Sons.  September accelerated sales of schoolbooks.  The coming of winter was anticipated late in the fall by increased purchases of gloves, mittens and flannel.  Miners bought squibs [fuese] and dynamite from the Lafflin and Rand Powder Company, pick handles, and lamp burners.  Housewives chose from a selection of stovepipes, mop handles, "chamber furniture", bureaus, writing desks, and for the more affluent, sewing machines from the Domestic Sewing Machne Company.

Brown's stores carried a small selection of toys, mirrors, and costume jewelry, but those were luxury items in early mining towns.  E. M. Gillett's Magic Yeast, flour, sugar, lard, slat and meats, but a more surprising delicacy was available, too, in the form of fresh fish brought in on the Buffalo, Rochester & Pittsburg Railroad from the Buffalo Fish Company;  and one January, Brown recorded the sale of  $92.67 worth of oysters.

If business was brisk at Brown's company store, this prosperity was mirrored in the bookkeepers' offices at 36 Wall Street.  By the close of the 1880's the Rochester & Pittsburg Coal & Iron Company had taken a secure place in the Jefferson County bituminous coal industry.  For the year which ended September 30, 1887, net earnings totalled $73,589.92. After the declaration of dividens in January and $19,589.92 remained in the balance, a significant amount of money for that day.  A statement of earnings for October, Nevember, and December showed that net profits totalled $27,966.04.  The Company's Directors declared that a dividend of 5/8 of one percent should be paid to stockholders of record.

Production figures for the Company's three mines, Beechtree Mines, Walston Mines, and Adrian Mines, for the period which ended December 31, 1888 showed how the Corporation had expanded in the seven years since its inception.  The production of the Beechtree Mines in ca.1888 totalled 138,743 tons of coal; 254 men and boys worked in and around the mines.  Walston Mines No. 1, No. 2 & No. 3 produced 457,964 tons of coal and 153,492 tons of coke and employed 647 men and boys in ca.1888.  At Adrian a new slope mine, Adrian No. 3 Mine, was sunk ca.1888 and a connection was made with Adrian No. 2 Mine;  this improvement enabled the fan to supply both mines with ample currents of air.  Adrian Mines production totalled 278,695 tons of coal and 25,252 tons of coke.

The Adrian Hospital was founded by Adrian Iselin of New York who gave $5000 for the purpose. The first hospital building was erected at the Adrian Mines (in Delancey) by the Rochester & Pittsburgh Coal & Iron Company in ca.1889. It's first purpose was to serve the men working in the mines, but soon became a general hospital serving not only the people of Adrian (Delancey) but the people of Punxsutawney as well. The Adrian Hospital was built to take care of the mine workers and their families.  The hospital turned out to be so good that the people of nearby Punxsutawney kept coming to it. Due to it's popularity, that building soon became inadequate. It was decided to move the facility into Punxsutawney.  In ca.1898, the Adrian Hospital moved to Punxsutawney.

The Adrian Hospital.
(Photo courtesy of the Special Collections Section, IUP Library, Indiana University of Pennsylvania, Indiana, PA)

Located at the corner of Jenks and Park Avenues in Punxsutawney. This photograph was taken in 1949 prior to the construction of a large addition to the front of the building. The Adrian Hospital was founded by Adrian Iselin of New York who gave $5,000 for the purpose. The first hospital building was erected at the Adrian Mines (in Delancey) by the Rochester & Pittsburgh Coal Company in 1889. Originally intended to serve the men working in the mines, it soon became a general hospital serving not only the people of Adrian (Delancey) but the people of Punxsutawney as well. Due to its popularity, that building soon became inadequate. It was decided to move the facility into Punxsutawney. The building pictured here was completed in 1898 with an appropriation from the Pennsylvania State Legislature for $100,000. Interestingly, in 1902 it cost $5 per week to stay in a hospital ward. A private room cost between $10 to $25 per week. Also of interest, the year 1901 saw the annual expenditure for medical supplies at $234.09 and salaries for nurses totaled $3,160.53. It isn't clear how many nurses were on staff that divided this sum. This building housed the hospital until 1975 when a new building was completed north of town on Route 36. The old structure was remodeled and is now occupied by Wellington Heights which is a personal care facility.

Thoughout the coal years (1886 to the 1930's) Adrian prospered. 36.5 million tons of coal were removed from the hill under the town of Adrian. In 1941 the operation finally became unprofitable and the mine was shut down. The entire town was sold to Nick and Mike Kovalchick of Sykesville. Some 250 home existed at the time, mostly company houses. In 1973, a deal was struck so that the residents of Adrian could buy their homes. The price was $4500 for a single home and $2500 for 1/2 a house and a non-profit organization was set up to provide mortgages without a down payment. By April 1974, everyone had bought their own house. Although the town has always been called Adrian, even to this day, the post office was called Delancey since there was another Adrian in Armstrong County. Delancey was named for Delancey Kane who was a grandson of Adrian Iselin. The state erected an official roadsign that said Delancey. Some resident, however put up a wooden sign below it that said Adrian. It's the town with two names.

from the "Punxsutawney Spirit," Punxsutawney, PA, Feb. 22, 1893.
A THIEF CAPTURED
The Stolen Property Found Upon His Person and Identified
A few days ago a man giving his name as Thomas Harrison applied to the coal company officials at Adrian for employment and was put to work loading coal. He was anything but a steady hand, and was finally discharged.

On Friday he was notified to leave his boarding house and went upstairs to pack his clothes. Some time after his departure it was discovered that he had stolen two silver watches and a pocketbook containing a small amount of money.

Andy Nichol, the policeman of Adrian mines, was notified of the occurrence, and a short time afterwards captured the man, the stolen property being found upon his person.

The accused was brought to this place on Friday evening and appearing before Thomas J. Cooper, Esq., was committed to jail to await trial.
[from the "Punxsutawney Spirit," Punxsutawney, PA, Feb. 22, 1893.]

From the Pennsylvania Mine Inspectors Report for 1906:
Adrian Mine was visited at proper intervals and the condition as to ventilation and drainage was good on each visit.  This mine is connected on one side with Florence Mine, which was found in good condition on each visit.  On the other side it is connected with Elk Run Shaft Mine, and the shaft workings were found in good condition as a whole.  Since the strike the shaft has been abandoned and is now used as a pumping station, as the drainage from Walston No. 3 Mine, Adrian Mine and Florence Mine all come to this point.  They have large Jeansville pumps.  In time of heavy rains it taxes the capscity of the pumps to the utmost, as the area of the different mines is very large as they have been working over twenty years.

Adrian Mines and Elk Run Shaft Mine produced 764,861 tons of coal and 124, 068 tons of coke in ca.1906, and employed 820 men and boys and 25 horses and mules at Adrian Mines.  Elk Run Shaft Mine Employed 285 men and boys and 7 horses and mules in ca.1906.

Between January, 1887 and the abandonment of the Adrian Mines on November 1, 1941, Rochester & Pittsburg Coal & Iron Compamy mined a total of 36,409,904 tons of coal.

from the "Olean Evening Times," Olean, NY, Nov. 9, 1911.
Adrian Mine Burning
Six Men Taken Out After Having Been Overcome by After Damp
Adrian, PA, Nov. 9, 1911
The Adrian mine of the Rochester and Pittsburg Coal & Iron Co. is burning.  Within half an hour after the flames broke out today six men were taken out overcome by afterdamp, while a large force was put to work immediately to rescue others reported to be in the drift.  Two hours after the fire broke out all the miners had been accounted for except three.  The mine employs about 300 men.
[from the "Olean Evening Times," Olean, NY, Nov. 9, 1911.]

from "Indiana Evening Gazette," Indiana, PA, Friday, Nov. 10, 1911.
Adrian Mine Disaster, Nov. 9, 1911
SIX FOREIGNERS DEAD IN ADRIAN MINE DISASTER
Rescue Work Is Hindered By Large Amount of Debris
Two Slavs Are Yet In Mine.
NO TRACE OF FIRE IN THE SHAFT

On account of the large mass of debris in the interior of the Adrian mine of the Rochester & Pittsburgh Coal Co., near Punxsutawney, in which an explosion took place on Thursday morning, the efforts of the rescue party to reach the bodies of two Slavs, who are known to be in the shaft, has been seriously interfered with.

Shortly after the explosion, four miners were gotten out and resuscitated after a half-hour's work. Six dead bodies were recovered during the day.

THE DEAD
Mike Scarcero, forty years old, married.
Samuel Bonsantie, twenty years old, single.
Lobert Scardotte, thirty years old, married.
Lewis Sack, twenty-six years old, single.
Peter Reitz, twenty-six years old, single.
Alfonzo Bellware, thirty-five years old, married.

MISSING
Mike Debannin, thirty-two years old, married.
Paul Sinoski, forty-five years old, married.

It is believed that the six dead miners, realizing that there had been an explosion, dropped their dinner buckets and ran further into the mine to rescue their fellow workmen. The dinner buckets were found about a mile and a half from the innermost workings of the mine, which is five miles from the entrance. It is probable that a pocket of gas was opened by the early workers and that the open lamps, which are used exclusively in the workings, ignited the flames. There is said to be no trace of fire in the mine.
[from "Indiana Evening Gazette," Indiana, PA, Friday, Nov. 10, 1911.];
[from "Indiana County Gazette," Indiana, Pa, Wednesday, Nov. 15, 1911.]
[Newspaper clipping courtesy of Paul R. Reitz,
Whitinsville, MA.]

Eight Victims Buried
Remains of Unfortunate Men Who Lost Their Lives in the Adrian Mine Disaster, Laid to Rest.

Although the morning was ushered in by a drizzling rain and a severe blizzard raged in the afternoon Adrian paid a tribute to its dead on Sabbath that will not soon be forgotten. The bodies of the eight victims: six Italian, one Polish and one Slavish of Thursday's mine disaster were buried Sabbath, the bodies of the Italians being buried at one time, side by side, in the Catholic cemetery.

In the morning, at 9 o'clock, a brass band of 30 pieces, accompanied by the members of four Italian lodges, visited the houses where the bodies lay. At 11 o'clock six hearses, containing the bodies, lined up in the rear of the band and the four fraternal orders on the road between Crawfordstown and Adrian. Following the hearses came carriages to the number of 100 or more and after them hundreds on foot. The procession to the church was very impressive. At the church Father Cantellmi conducted services and at 1:30 the funeral procession reached the Anita Catholic Cemetery, where the bodies were interred.

The funeral of the Slav was held in the evening and burial was made in the Greek Catholic cemetery. The attendance at the services was large. The body of the Pole was also buried in the evening and several fraternal lodges attended.
[from the "Indiana Weekly Messenger," Indiana, PA, Wednesday, Nov. 15, 1911]

from the "Clearfield Progress," Clearfield, PA, Fri., Feb. 6, 1925.
Adrian Mines are Leased to a New Concern by R. & P.
Also Reported That the Stanley Operation Has Been Leased to the Erie Ry. Interests.
TO RESUME WORK

The Rochester and Pittsburgh Coal and Iron Company, in pursuance of a policy announced several weeks ago that it would either lease or sell its mines, has leased its Adrian property to the Jefferson and Indiana Coal Company, a corporation composed of Indiana Residents.  John Hare, foremerly of Reynoldsville, this county, is president of the corporation:  J. R. Richards, formerly sheriff of Indiana county, and Joseph P. Mack, also a former Jefferson county resident, is treasurer of the leasing company.

The lease includes the power plant, houses and other buildings on the company property at Adrian.  It is the purpose of the leasing company to operate the mine as soon as possible and to that end 25 men were put to work cleaning up the mine preparatory to operating the mine to capacity.

The officers of the Jefferson and Indiana Coal Company, named above are the only stockholders of that company.

Mr. O'Hare, for many years a resident of Reynoldsville, who several years ago moved from Homer City to Indiana, has been associated with the coal business practically his entire life.  With Mr. Richards, who served the people of Indiana county as sheriff and Mr. Mack, he enjoys the confidence and esteem of an unsually large acquaintance.  The members of the company have thru past business successes proven themselves thoroughly competent to operate one of the largest coal mining properties in Jefferson county.

James Cummings, formerly superintendent of the Adrian mine, has been employed by the leasing company in that capacity.  It is the announced purpose of the company to give preference in employment to men who worked at Adrian prior to the shutdown of several months.

The Adrian mine when working at capacity employs about 400 men and its resumption will mean much to Punxsutawney from an industrial standpoint.

The leasing company expects to have the mine in readiness for operation in about 10 days.

Another property of the R. and P. C. and I. company has been leased.  The Stanley mine was turned over to the Northwestern Mining Company on lease about two weeks ago and is now in operation.
[from the "Clearfield Progress," Clearfield, PA, Fri., Feb. 6, 1925.]

from the "Indiana Evening Gazette," Indiana, PA, Wed., Nov. 25, 1925
Modern Tipple At Adrian Mine
Jefferson & Indiana Company to Look Over New Structure Monday.
Punxsutawney, Nov. 25, 1925.
On Monday of the coming week coal from the Adrian mine of the Jefferson & Indiana Coal Company will be loaded over the new steel tipple, which has been in process of erection the past month.

The new tipple which is entirely of steel, was erected as a cost of approximately $80,000.  The actural construction work on the tipple consumed but 23 days, which coal men state is a record for tipple construction on a structure of this size.

Workmen are now busy on a new track layout made necessary by the change in tipples and it is expected that this will be completed not later than Saturday.

The tipple is the last word in modern mining.  The mine cars are dumped about 100 feet from the loading end of the tipple and the coal is conveyed from that point to the railroad cars by belt conveyors.  Increased loading facilities will greatly increase the potential output of the mine.

Numerous other improvements have been made at Adrian during the past two months, making it one of the model mining towns in this section.  The streets are now lighted by arc lights and electric lights have been placed in every company house in the town, with electric attachments for washers, electric irons, etc.

During the past month the production of the mine averaged about 1,500 tons per day, the greatest production the mine has reached since 1914.  The life of the mine, at present production is estimated at about 30 years.

There are about 370 working in the mine at the present time.
[from the "Indiana Evening Gazette," Indiana, PA, Wed., Nov. 25, 1925.]

from the "Indiana Evening Gazette," Indiana, PA, Wed., Aug. 11, 1926
Will Rebuild Adrian Store
Structure Destroyed by Fire Served Important Territory

The store needs of the residents of Adrian are today being supplied through the Florence Store of the Mahoning Supply Company, the big stoire at Adrian haveing been destroyed by fire monday together with all its contents.  Although the Mahoning Supply Company had not made definite decision as to whether or not the store will be constructed it is probable that reconstruction will begin in the very near future.

The Adrian Mine, under lease to the Jefferson and Indiana Coal Company, has a long life ahead of it and it is not probable that the town, now more properous than it has been in many years, will be without a company store for many moons.

At a considerable expense the Jefferson and Indiana Coal Company is driving through a great rock fault in the mine and when this is completed a vast expanse of coal, heretofore blocked by the fault, will be available.  The company is producing about 2,000 tons of coal daily and but recently completed a gigantic steel tipple there.

Although the coal market of Central Pennsylvania is far from normal there is an increasing demand and the prospects for a continuance are bright.  The price continues low, the major portion of the coal selling at $1/65 at the mine.  Approximately 50 cars daily are passing over the B. R. and P. Railway Company's scales at Cloe, which approximates normal business.

The Rossiter mine of the Clearfield Bituminous Coal Corporation is working six days a week and the prospects for a continuamce of capacity production there are bright.
[from the "Indiana Evening Gazette," Indiana, PA, Wed., Aug. 11, 1926.]

In ca.1924 the Rochester & Pittsburg Coal & Iron Company closes its mines and towns at Adrian, Eleanora, and Helvetia. Over 2,000 miners are thrown out of work.

In ca.1925 the Adrian Mine is the first of a number of the former Rochester & Pittsburg Coal & Iron Company mines to be reopened by another company, a subsidiary of Rochester & Pittsburgh Coal Company, called the Jefferson & Indiana Coal Company. The UMWA protests these actions by holding demonstrations. Operators throughout the region step up their efforts to break the union. The mines which were formerly unionized now are reopened on a nonunion basis.

In ca.1927 miners march on the Adrian Mines and are arrested for violating a court injunction that was issued in 1925.

In 1941 the operation finally became unprofitable and the mine was shut down.

The entire town of Adrian was sold to Nick and Mike Kovalchick of Sykesville, PA. Some 250 home existed at the time, mostly company houses. In 1973, a deal was struck so that the residents of Adrian could buy their homes. The price was $4500 for a single home and $2500 for 1/2 a house and a non-profit organization was set up to provide mortgages without a down payment. By April 1974, everyone had bought their own house. Although the town has always been called Adrian, even to this day, the post office was called Delancey since there was another Adrian in Armstrong County. Delancey was named for Delancey Kane who was a grandson of Adrian Iselin. The state erected an official roadsign that said Delancey. Some resident, however put up a wooden sign below it that said Adrian. It's the town with two names.
(Historical text adapted from "Rochester & Pittsburgh Coal Company, The First One Hundred Years" by Eileen Mountjoy Cooper, ca.1982.  used with permission of Eileen Mountjoy.)

from the "Indiana Evening Gazette," Indiana, PA, Tues., April 6, 1937
Florence Mine to Reopen

The Florence mine of the Rochester and Pittsburgh Coal Company, idle more than 10 years will be reopened.  L.W. Householder, vice president and general manager of the company announced, giving employment to approximately 100 men, many of whom will be recruited from the Adrian Mine.

A tram road approximately three miles in length will be built from the Florence mine to the Adrian tipple over which the Florence coal will be dumped.  "We expect to start construction on the tram road," said Mr. Householder this morning."  "Soon after the district scale committees, which will meet Wednesday in Philadelphia, complete their negotiations.

It is estimated that there is approximately 300,000 tons of recoverable coal in the Florence Mine.  Due to the length of the corridors there it is estimated that it will take at least five years to recover the mineable coal.  While the major portion of the mine's production will be trammed to the Adrian tipple, corridors in the Adrian mine will be extended to tap part of the Florence coal.

Operations have been somewhat restricted in the Adrian mine in the past year and a number of the employes of that mine will be placed in the Florence workings.  Houses owned by the company in Florence will not be rehabilitated since the majority of miners employed there will live in neighboring towns.
[from the "Indiana Evening Gazette," Indiana, PA, Tues., April 6, 1937.]

from "The Clearfield Progress," Clearfield, PA, Nov. 29, 1941.
400 Lose Jobs As Adrian Mine Closes
Reynoldsville, PA, Nov. 29, 1941.
About 400 men at Adrian coal morning hamlet near here will lose their jobs today when the Adrian mine of the Rochester and Pittsburgh Coal Company ceases production.

Decision to close the mine was announced yesterday by superintendent Wellington Craig.

The shut down will mark the finish of one of the richest mines in the history of the soft coal field in the area.  Since the pit was first opened in 1886, it has yielded approximately 37,000,000 tons of coal, with production hitting a high mark of more than a million and a hald tons yearly in the period preceding the World War.

A few men who will work the last shift today were among those who helped open the mine before the start of the century.
[from "The Clearfield Progress," Clearfield, PA, Sat., Nov. 29, 1941.]

from the "Indiana Evening Gazette," Indiana, PA, Dec. 4, 1941
Adrian Mine Being Salvaged
Most of Miners Will be Given Work At Ernest and Helvetia

Punxsutawney, Dec. 4, 1841
The job of salvaging materials from the Adrian mine of the Rochester & Pittsburgh Coal Company is about completed.  Most of the unused timber and the recovered wire and rails are being moved to the Helvetia mine of the same company.

Of the 204 home units in the town of Adrian only 36 are now vacant.  The R. & P. Company has work for practically all the able miners formerly employed at Adrian in its Helvetia and Ernest mines and it is probable trhat buses will be run to both the Helvetia and Ernest mines.  The lines have not yet been established but it is believed they will be in the very near future.

Meanwhile a considerable number of Adrian residents are going to Helvetia daily in provate cars and others are employed in the salvaging process there.

It is possible that a special payday will be arranged for the Adrian miners for some day this week so that all obligations can be met and the book work for the Adrian mine closed.  Ordinarily there would be no pay until about the thirteenth of the month.  A pay on Saturday next is a strong possibility.
[from the "Indiana Evening Gazette," Indiana, PA, Thur., Dec. 4, 1941.]

A mine motor and miners inside the Adrian Mine, ca.1940.
(Photo courtesy of the Jefferson County Historical Society, Brookville, PA.)

A Man trip coming out of one of the Adrian Mines, with the miners riding in the mine wagons.
(Photo courtesy of the Pam Moras.)

Miners outside one the Adrian Mines.
(Photo courtesy of the Pam Moras.)

An Adrian miner on his way home after working his shift.
(Photo courtesy of the Pam Moras.)

Coal Miners Memorial Adrian Mines & Coke Works,
Adrian, Delancey, Young Twp., Jefferson Co., PA

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