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Coal Miners Memorial Indianola Mine, Indianola, Indiana Twp., Allegheny Co., PA


Coal Mines of Allegheny Co., PA MAIN INDEX
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Indianola No. 1 Mine,
Indianola,
Indiana Twp.,
Allegheny County,
Pennsylvania, U.S.A.

A Tribute to the Coal Miners that mined the Bituminous Coal seams of the Indianola Mine, Allegheny County, Pennsylvania, U.S.A.

Compiled & Edited by
Raymond A. Washlaski

Raymond A. Washlaski, Historian, Editor,
Ryan P. Washlaski, Technical Editor,

Updated Sept. 30, 2009

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Indianola No. 1 Mine (ca.1903-  ?  ),
Located on the West Penn Railroad (Proposed) later a branch line from the Bessemer & Lake Erie Railroad was built to the mine, Indianola, Indiana Twp., Allegheny Co., PA
[Indianola No. 1 Mine was under construction in ca.1903.]
Owners: (ca.1903-   ?  ), Indianola Coal Company, Pittsburg, PA

              (ca.1919-  ?  ), Inland Collieries Company, Indianola, PA
              (ca.1920-  ?  ), Inland Collieries Company, Indianola, PA

Indianola No. 1 Mine:
 Mine No. 1 of the Indianola Coal Company, is situated in Indiana township, Allegheny county, on the Big Deer Creek, three miles north of Harmarville.  It is one of several projected by this company to develop a field of the Freeport coal, containing about eighty-five hundred acres.  This coal in this locality is of exceptional thickness and quality.  the shafts show an eight foot vain of good quality, and numerous drillings show the entire field to be underlaid with this vein, with an average thickness of seven feet, six inches.

Two shafts have been sunk to the coal two hundred and five feet apart.  The main shaft is twenty two feet, six inches by eleven feet,  three inches over all, giving in the clear three compartments, each six feet, six inches by nine feet, seven inches.

The air shaft is eighteen feet, ten inches by eleven feet, three inches over all, with provisions for one compartment seven feet, one inch by nine feet, seven inches in the clear for an upcast air way.  Another compartment six feet, six inches by nine feet, seven inches in the clear for a hoist way for the men, and a third compartment nine feet, seven inches by two feet, three inches, to be used exclusively for pipes.  This compartment will be cut off from all communication with the return air way, in order to avaid any danger from gas. Some gas has been encountered in this coal, and as the coal is one hundred and ninty feet below the surface, it is expected that considerable gas will be found.

The shaft sinking has been carried on by electric light and the mining with safety lamps of the Wolf pattern.  A fixed rule has been laid down that no open lights shall be used in this mine for any purpose.  The coal will be mined by air and a thirty by thirty inch Norwalk compressor and two two hundred and fifty horse power return tubular boilers have been installed on their permanent foundations and used in the shaft sinking.

The ventilation will be taken care of by a thirteen foot, six inch double inlet Capell fan.  There will not likely by any shipment of coal from this plant before the spring of 1904, as the railroad has not yet been extended from the West Penn Railroad at Harmaville, a distance of three miles.
(From the "Report of the Dept. of Mines of Pennsylvania for 1903.")

[The Indianola Mine was never opened in 1903 and lay idle for many years after the Harwick Mine disaster.]

Indianola: Coal Company Patch Town:
Extracted from an article by Ray Bernabei

In 1919 the town of Indianola was built as the "Last word in coal producing and miner;'s home development."  The houses featured running water and electric lights, although many houses did not have electricity till much later.  Pre-cut houses were shipped from Michigan to Harmarville by railroad and loaded on one ton horse drawn wagons and driven on a dirt road to Indianola.

Indianola was a coal mining town owned by Republic Steel and Inland Steel, Inland Colliers Company, a subsidiary of Inland Steel, had a 26 year old Lehigh University graduate, Thomas T. G. Fear, as it superintendent of Mines.  It was Mr.Fear who laid out the town with bungalows and double row houses.  He also designed a big boarding house where individual miners coal stay.  Fear had built towns in Tennessee and Alabama before arriving in Indianola about 1916, to reopen the Indianola No. 1 Mine.

Ray Bernabei
Indianola - The Town and Soccer.  Published in: Our Coal Mining Comunity Heritage:  Harmarville, Pa by Jeanna Svitesic Cecil, 2001

"Coal Miners Memorial, Indianola Mine,
Indianola, Indiana Twp., Allegheny County, Pennsylvania"
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